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The Institute of Strategic and International Studies (ISIS) Malaysia will be organising the 30th Asia-Pacific Roundtable at the Hilton Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from 30 May–1 June 2016.

The Institute of Strategic and International Studies (ISIS) Malaysia will be organising the 30th Asia-Pacific Roundtable (APR@30) at the Hilton Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from 30 May–1 June 2016. The Roundtable is convened annually on behalf of the ASEAN Institutes of Strategic and International Studies (ASEAN-ISIS), a network of Southeast Asia's leading think-tanks.

The point of discussion is Cooperation and Contestation in a Changing Regional Landscape.

Draft Programme (as of 19 Feb 2016) is as following:

 Monday, 30 May 2016

 

1900 - 2000 Networking reception

 

2000 - 2010 Introductory remarks

 

2010 - 2030 Keynote address by The Honourable Prime Minister of Malaysia

 

2100 - 2200 Welcoming dinner

 

 

Tuesday, 31 May 2016

 

0900 - 1100 PLENARY 1: REGIONAL SECURITY IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC: PRESENT STATE AND FUTURE TRAJECTORIES

Territorial disputes and terrorism are long-standing, evolving legacies that continue to concern the security of the Asia-Pacific. More recent and less predictable challenges include changing power dynamics, economic uncertainties, and climate change implications. What do present and over-the-horizon trends indicate for the Asia-Pacific’s mid- to long-term security prospects? Is Asia’s rise guaranteed and what might be the expectations for, and of, a more prosperous and influential Asia? Can the region effectively align economic and political interests where they threaten to diverge? How will the rise of non-state actors impact the state’s role in providing security? How will big and medium powers influence these future trajectories?

 

1100 - 1115 Refreshments

 

1115 - 1245 PLENARY 2: THE ASEAN COMMUNITY: INTEGRATION IN AN AGE OF CONTENDING INTERESTS

The formal establishment of the ASEAN Community underlines ASEAN’s aspirations of instituting a truly rules-based, people-cantered-and-oriented and integrated Community. As it strives towards these aspirations however, it will have to take into account the various contending strategic interests – from both within and outside ASEAN. What are the major internal challenges ASEAN faces in its journey towards becoming a more integrated Community? How will “ASEAN centrality” hold amid surrounding major power competition and rivalry? Is the EAS the most appropriate vehicle for ASEAN and its partners to address the strategic challenges of the region, or are there other mechanisms to be considered?

 

1245 - 1415 LUNCH

 

1415 - 1545 Concurrent 1: Strategic Update: North East Asia

Concurrent 2: Strategic Update: The Americas

Concurrent 3: Strategic Update: South Asia

 

1545 - 1600 Refreshments

 

1600 - 1730 Concurrent 4: Strategic Update: South East Asia and Oceania

Concurrent 5: Strategic Update: West Asia and Africa

Concurrent 6: Strategic Update: Europe

 

1845 - 2030 DINNER

 

 

Wednesday, 1 June 2016

 

0900 – 1030 PLENARY 3: HEARTS AND MINDS: NEW STRATEGIES TO BATTLE IGNORANCE, VIOLENCE AND EXTREMISM

Despite the significant amount of money and effort put into combating ‘terror’ and the ideologies and thinking that drive it, the results leave much to be desired. Indeed, the attitudes that beget such extreme violence seem to be thriving in some parts of the world and causing similar, retaliatory responses. Just how much of a threat do extremist groups like Daesh pose to the region? Is the international community losing the war against extremist-driven violence? What new strategies or approaches could be employed to deal with the ignorance and ideologies that fuel violence and extremism? What can be done to better convince stakeholders that it is not just the battle on the field that needs to be won but also the battle for the hearts and minds?

 

1030 - 1100 Refreshments

 

1100 – 1230 PLENARY 4: ENERGY PRICES, CLIMATE CHANGE AND GEOPOLITICS: WHAT'S NEXT?

The nexus between energy and geopolitics appears to be shifting with the fast-paced changes in the energy sector. This will have a significant impact on global energy trade flow, energy security and energy pricing globally. Thrown into this changing dynamics are the unprecedented effects of climate change and the global efforts to mitigate its fallouts. How will fluctuating energy prices impact global and regional geopolitics? Is the world seeing the emergence of a new fulcrum in the global energy supply and demand chain? Could the long-term obligations of climate change agreements change the global energy landscape, especially for the United States, China and developing countries?

 

1230 - 1400 LUNCH

 

 

1400 - 1530 PLENARY 5: HUMAN INSECURITY: CONFRONTING DISPLACEMENT AND TRAFFICKING

The displacement and trafficking of entire communities affected by human insecurity is a complex, sensitive and often emotive issue with no easy solution in sight. While much of the attention was focused on Europe’s ‘refugee crisis’, Southeast Asia also experienced its own version of a ‘refugee crisis’ – the abrupt large scale movement of Rohingya and Bengali boat people of the Straits of Malacca and the Andaman Sea. What caused the sudden influx of displaced persons into some countries in this region and will it happen again? How do stakeholders – governments, NGOs, businesses and communities – confront the issue of displacement and trafficking? What lessons could Southeast Asia and Europe draw from each other on how – and how not – to manage the problem and to better protect those who have been displaced or trafficked?

 

1530 - 1600 Refreshments

 

1600 - 1730 PLENARY 6: SECURITY AND STABILITY IN THE SOUTH CHINA SEA: POSSIBILITIES AMID COMPLEXITIES

The situation in the South China Sea is increasingly being subjected to added layers of complexity. Action-reaction dynamics between the major powers will increasingly influence the security environment in the area. The full impact of the artificial-island-building and construction projects in the South China Sea remains to be seen. Added to that, are the possible reactions to a speculated mid-2016 decision by the Permanent Court of Arbitration on the proceedings initiated by the Philippines. This session is aimed at exploring opportunities to moderate the risks of misunderstanding and tension in the South China Sea, even as the various parties maintain their positions on various aspects of international law. What kinds of mechanisms are needed for the South China Sea in the immediate term? How can the major powers better reassure each other and the region of their intentions in the area? What role is ASEAN able to play?

 

1730 - 1745 CLOSING REMARKS